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SUMMER-TIME SCHOOL BREAK SPELLS INCREASED TV AND INTERNET TIME FOR TEENS
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SUMMER-TIME SCHOOL BREAK SPELLS INCREASED TV AND INTERNET TIME FOR TEENS

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After 10 months of pouring over books and dodging teachers’ dirty looks, teens are now in the middle of summer break. With time on their hands, Filipino teens in urban areas are consuming more media, presenting opportunities for brands to connect with this influential market segment.

Savvy and exposed to more media platforms than most, the Philippines’ urban teens represent 25 percent of urban media consumers. Not surprisingly, their hefty numbers combined with their spike in summertime media consumption sees a notable rise in the type, intensity and level of engagement of marketing and other advertising-related summer campaigns aimed at this segment. But with teens becoming more discerning and fickle in their likes and dislikes, not all of these campaigns hit the mark.

TV REMAINS TEENS’ TOP PICK

Despite the allure of other media platforms, teens’ main media of choice is still TV. About 93 percent of urban teens watch TV daily. This preference for TV is heightened during summer when TV viewing by teens increases significantly between the hours of 6 am and 2 pm, compared to non-summer months. In summer, the number of teens watching TV in the morning is 2.2 percent higher while a 5.2 percent increase is seen at noontime. Daily, during the summer months, teens are extending TV time by an average of eight more minutes in the morning and six more minutes during noontime.

Although the length of TV consumption changes between the summer and non-summer months, teens’ preference for telenovelas, news, cartoons and movies remains consistent throughout the year. Brands that wish to connect with urban teens should consider anchoring their advertising campaigns on TV, with increased presence during daytime and within the types of program genres teens have been seen to prefer.

RADIO IS STILL IN THE BACKGROUND

Next to TV, radio remains one of the most consumed media by teens in urban Philippines with around 38 percent saying they listen on a daily basis. However, during the summer months, there is no significant change to their consumption of radio, compared to non-summer months.

INTERNET-SAVVY TEENS

More than one in four urban teens (26%) access the internet on a daily basis, and while there is no significant change to the frequency with which teens access the internet in the summer months, they are certainly spending more time online, with the greatest proportion (49%) using the internet for 1-2 hours and a further 16.3 percent spending over three hours online per day. In contrast, during school months, internet usage is notably shorter with the greatest number of teens (51.7%) going online for between 30 minutes to an hour.

While school is out, internet portal or search engine sites such as Google and Yahoo experience less visits from urban teens (down 9.3% for Google, lower by 8.8% for Yahoo). Marketers and advertisers would have greater opportunities to reach urban teens through social-oriented websites such as Facebook, which is up 12.5 percent and Yahoo Mail with an 8.3 percent increase. There are no significant changes in engagement of urban teens with other teen top sites such as Y8.com for online gaming and with YouTube for media or content sharing.

STILL LOVING THE PRINTED WORD

Meanwhile, frequency of reading the newspaper or magazines is steady for urban teens, with about 24 percent reading a newspaper at least once a week and 7 percent reading a monthly magazine at least once a month. Marketers should not miss an opportunity to reach teens regardless of the season, as 30.8 percent of monthly magazine readers are teens, and 6.2 percent of all newspaper readers are teens.