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PAKISTAN’S CONSUMER CONFIDENCE HOLDS STEADY IN Q2 2014

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New Interactive Nielsen Data Tool Reveals 9 Years of Historical Consumer Confidence Trends 

KARACHI July 23rd 2014 –– Pakistan consumer confidence held steady at 99 for two consecutive quarters, according to consumer confidence findings from Nielsen, a leading global provider of information and insights into what consumers watch and buy. Confidence declined over the previous quarter in the overall Middle East/Africa region (93), decreasing one point. Among the region, UAE led the way for Middle East/Africa consumer confidence with an index of 109, a decline of five points from first-quarter 2014. Egypt (81) reported a drop of six points compared to the first quarter. South Africa posted the only regional confidence increase, climbing three points to 85, and confidence held steady in Saudi Arabia (102).

“Pakistani consumers are generally optimistic as seen by mostly high Consumer Confidence scores over the last three years. However, a score of 99 in the first as well as the second quarter of this year, is the highest we’ve seen since the second quarter of 2011,” said Mustafa Moosajee, Managing Director, Nielsen Pakistan. “This reflects the overall mood in the country, especially relating to economic conditions. The economy is showing signs of recovery but macro challenges remain.”[1]

In conjunction with the second-quarter index release, Nielsen is unveiling a new interactive data visualization tool based on nine years of historical global consumer confidence data, which spans 60 countries and represents a global online population of some 2 billion consumers. The Nielsen Global Consumer Confidence Trend Tracker allows users to select a variety of different data points related to consumer economic sentiment to create dynamic visualizations by region, country, issue, and time period.

The Nielsen Global Survey of Consumer Confidence and Spending Intentions, established in 2005, measures consumer confidence, major concerns, and spending intentions among more than 30,000 respondents with Internet access[2] in 60 countries. Consumer confidence levels above and below a baseline of 100 indicate degrees of optimism and pessimism.

JOB OUTLOOK IMPROVES

Positive perceptions about local job prospects over the next 12 months increased in the second quarter in the Middle East/Africa region by 2 percentage points up to 42 percent. Pakistan followed this positive trend: 45 percent of respondents registered positive perceptions of employment opportunities, compared with 40 percent in the first quarter.

More than half (56%) of Middle East/ Africa respondents viewed their personal finances in a positive light which held steady from the first quarter. Controversially, in Pakistan, 59 percent of the respondents believed the state of their finances was good or excellent, up from 57 percent in the first quarter.

Recessionary sentiment improved in the Middle East / Africa region, where the percentage of respondents who believed they were in recession dropped from 73 percent in the first quarter 2014 to 71 percent. 73 percent of Pakistani respondents believed they were in a recession in the second quarter. The sentiment was down 3 percentage points from Q1 and 7 points down from the same time period the previous year (Q2 2013).

[1] Note that the fieldwork for the Q2 survey was conducted in May 2014. Hence, this survey does not take into account consumer sentiments towards recent security and political incidents in Pakistan that took place in and after June 2014.

2 While an online survey methodology allows for tremendous scale and global reach, it provides a perspective on the habits of existing Internet users, not total populations. In developing markets where online penetration has not reached majority potential, audiences may be younger and more affluent than the general population of that country. Additionally, survey responses are based on claimed behavior, rather than actual metered data.

About the Nielsen Global Survey

The Nielsen Global Survey of Consumer Confidence and Spending Intentions was conducted May 12-30, 2014, and polled more than 30,000 online consumers in 60 countries throughout Asia-Pacific, Europe, Latin America, the Middle East, Africa and North America. The sample has quotas based on age and sex for each country based on its Internet users, is weighted to be representative of Internet consumers and has a maximum margin of error of ±0.6%. This Nielsen survey is based on the behavior of respondents with online access only. Internet penetration rates vary by country. Nielsen uses a minimum reporting standard of 60-percent Internet penetration or 10M online population for survey inclusion. The China Consumer Confidence Index is compiled from a separate mixed methodology survey among 3,500 respondents in China. The Nielsen Global Survey, which includes the Global Consumer Confidence Index, was established in 2005.

About Nielsen

Nielsen Holdings N.V. (NYSE: NLSN) is a global information and measurement company with leading market positions in marketing and consumer information, television and other media measurement, online intelligence and mobile measurement. Nielsen has a presence in approximately 100 countries, with headquarters in New York, USA, and Diemen, the Netherlands. For more information, visit www.nielsen.com.

[1] Note that the fieldwork for the Q2 survey was conducted in May 2014. Hence, this survey does not take into account consumer sentiments towards recent security and political incidents in Pakistan that took place in and after June 2014.

[2] While an online survey methodology allows for tremendous scale and global reach, it provides a perspective on the habits of existing Internet users, not total populations. In developing markets where online penetration has not reached majority potential, audiences may be younger and more affluent than the general population of that country. Additionally, survey responses are based on claimed behavior, rather than actual metered data.