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Connected Consumers, Big Business Success
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Connected Consumers, Big Business Success

How do you make the most of a world where people check their phones in bed, at dinner and even in the bathroom?

The ways to connect with consumers on a personal level have never been more abundant. And the potential for successful marketing is even greater. Carolyn Everson, Facebook’s VP of Global Marketing Solutions and Stephen Quinn, Walmart’s EVP/Chief Marketing Officer, took the stage at Nielsen’s Consumer 360 Conference this week in San Antonio to share how they turn big data into big business outcomes.

According to Facebook’s Everson, the average person checks their phone 100-150 times a day. She also said that consumers often start their experiences on one device and then end on another, so marketing efforts need to follow that same path. Even as a leading tech company, Everson said Facebook knew it had to evolve into a mobile company when, in 2012, more users joined the social network service on their mobile devices than on their desktops.

There’s no denying the power of mobile—both literally and figuratively. Today, the mobile phones we carry have more power in them than the technology that was used to send the first man to the moon. And according to Everson, one-third of the world’s 7 billion people are connected. When you have penetration at that scale, Everson said marketers need to focus on people and how to add value to their lives.

Walmart has been building personalized shopping experiences for its customers for years, and the retail giant has been winning their hearts, minds and wallets along the way. With 140 million in-store customers and 50 million online shoppers each week, Walmart has turned the world’s largest consumer database into a more-connected, personal experience. So as Walmart has grown into one of the world’s largest companies, Quinn shared some examples of how the company made big business small again:

  • Through mobile ads, the retailer began delivering “fresh alerts” to its most frequent buyers whenever a new delivery of fruit arrived at their local stores. The result? Customer loyalty increased and shoppers expanded their purchases by buying from even more of the total store.
  • To engage with families, Walmart delivered back-to-school ads to Facebook users of school age children in the weeks just before their school districts opened for the new school year. This precision marketing approach drove a return on investment (ROI) that was 16 times greater than the cost of the campaign.

To make the most of the connected consumer and the unprecedented access to them, Everson and Quinn agreed that marketers must up their games. They also emphasized that in an era of growing fragmentation, retailers that can shape more personalized, total customer experiences will be ahead of the pack. To sum it all up, Everson closed by noting that “Social metrics are nice, but business outcomes are better.”