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Nielsen at the White House: “Improving the Lives of Women and Girls”

Today, Nielsen’s senior vice president of professional services, Carol Gstalder, helped set the stage at The White House Council on Women and Girls’ first United State of Women. Featuring the President and First Lady, Oprah Winfrey, Billie Jean King, and Warren Buffett, the event celebrates what women have already achieved, and looks forward to what still needs to be done.

As part of our Data for Good (SM) initiative, Karen Kornbluh, Nielsen’s executive vice president of external affairs, and  Leslie Krohn, senior vice president of consumer insights, recently met with the First Lady’s Office and the Council of Economic Advisers to present the Harris Poll’s International Women’s Day findings. This lead to an invitation for Gstalder to present data on changing attitudes about women in America at the White House United State of Women Summit.

Gstalder’s presentation looked back at Harris Poll data from the early 1970s and showcased significant changes in attitudes toward achievement for women and girls that have taken place in recent decades. She also highlighted the work still to be done.

Addressing the more than 5,000 attendees, Gstalder remarked, “The nation has come a long way in improving the lives of American women and girls since 1971, yet the data indicate the Nation is not done yet. The consensus is that women have the power to change their lives, the workforce, their communities and the world. To that end, there is an important role for business, non-profits, government, educators, the media and other public stakeholders. Today, a majority agree that together we can make a difference.”

Through our Data for Good strategy, Nielsen creates opportunities to share our insights about consumers with policymakers and civil society to make our country and economy stronger.

Nielsen has a lot to be proud of in our own journey to equity for women. This year, Nielsen was recognized by Diversity MBA for having both global and U.S. female representation at or above 50%, with women in over one-third of Nielsen senior leadership (senior vice president or higher) roles.

“The concept of using ‘Data for Good’ is embedded in the DNA of Nielsen,” says Kornbluh. “We partner with organizations to leverage the same strategies and big data assets that corporations use to make better decision to help solve global issues affecting the communities where our associates live and work. Breaking down barriers to equality and inclusion for women and girls, positively impacts families, communities and the global economy. Presenting at The United State of Women is one of the many ways we engage powerful stakeholders to leverage our unique skills and assets to make a positive impact.”